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Alcohol Addiction

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Alcohol addiction is generally known as alcoholism, although the terms alcoholism and alcoholic can be used in a derogatory manner.

Alcohol addiction is now widely accepted as a chronic brain disease that can affect anyone – from all walks of life. It is also widely accepted that one cannot blame any one factor for the onset of the disease.

Genetics and environment factors – like whether your family members have also suffered alcohol addiction, and where you were brought up – can often do both play a part in the development of the disease. If there is a history of alcoholism and heavy drinkers in your family you do statistically have more of a chance to develop a drinking problem, than another person without such hereditary influences.

People with mental health struggles and/or disorders like depression, anxiety or bipolar disorder are statistically more at risk of becoming dependent on a substance such as alcohol addiction. Individuals in these subgroups may use alcohol for self-medication which – a behavior that can easily become habit forming.

Whilst the fields of study such as neuroscience are able to explain more and more about the human brain, and diseases such as alcohol addiction, many areas of this topic remain overshadowed by doubt and controversy.

If you, or someone you are worried about, need to drink regularly to feel relaxed, feels ashamed, are trying to hide your drinking and cannot control yourself… if your family and friends are worried about your alcohol addiction, then you are surely facing a serious problem called alcoholism.

If you or someone you know is suffering from alcohol addiction effects, then the first step is to take an action. If you find yourself telling lies and engaging in bizarre behavior in order to sneak in a quick drink. Speak to your GP as soon as possible or call our helpline now for alcohol addiction treatment.

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